2009 Canadian Closed Competition <br>
Junior Latin : 2nd Richard Lifshitz & Bella Paskova, Québec ; 1st - Winson Tam & Anna-Nina Kus, Ontario
Adult 3 (Senior 2) Latin : 2nd Claude & Diane Demers, Québec ; 1st – Roland & Carol Cyr, New Brunswick
Adult 2 (Senior 1) Latin: 2nd Yvan Lacroix & Manon Lemay, Québec; 1st Jim Deglau & Elena Sinelnikova, Alberta
Youth Standard :2nd Stanislav Kestel & Virginie Primeau-Poirier, Québec; 1st -Patrick Rucinski & Ella Nusenbaum, Ontario
Adult Standard: 2nd Richard Tonizzo & Claire Hansen, Ontario; 1st Anton Belyayev & Antoaneta Popova, Ontario
2009 Canadian Closed Competition
Junior Latin : 2nd Richard Lifshitz & Bella Paskova, Québec ; 1st - Winson Tam & Anna-Nina Kus, Ontario Adult 3 (Senior 2) Latin : 2nd Claude & Diane Demers, Québec ; 1st – Roland & Carol Cyr, New Brunswick Adult 2 (Senior 1) Latin: 2nd Yvan Lacroix & Manon Lemay, Québec; 1st Jim Deglau & Elena Sinelnikova, Alberta Youth Standard :2nd Stanislav Kestel & Virginie Primeau-Poirier, Québec; 1st -Patrick Rucinski & Ella Nusenbaum, Ontario Adult Standard: 2nd Richard Tonizzo & Claire Hansen, Ontario; 1st Anton Belyayev & Antoaneta Popova, Ontario

Is DanceSport a “Sport”?

One frequently-asked question is whether DanceSport is "really a sport".

The IOC considered this question when DanceSport applied to it in the early 1990s and reviewed its definitions of "sport".

The IOC believes that it should analyze modern activities by deciding how they fit into certain activity continuums, one from Art (i.e. ballet) to Sport (i.e. figure skating), another from Mechanical (i.e. motor racing) to Biomechanical (i.e. bobsledding), and a third from Education (i.e. gymnastics) to Entertainment (i.e. circus performances) (examples are mine, not CADA's or the IOC's).

The IOC holds that if an activity has more Sport than Art content, is more related to Biomechanical than to Mechanical advantage, and is intended as more Educational than Entertainment-oriented, it should be seriously considered for inclusion in the Olympic family.

In a now-famous 1984 study at the University of Freiburg in Germany, identical physiological tests were administered to successful track stars and successful amateur DanceSport competitors. Results showed that a DanceSport competition required all the same kinds and degrees of exertion and physical demands as running the 800-metre race.

The only exception is that at major international championships, DanceSport competitors may be required to perform the same competition four to six times in a day, sometimes for days in a row!

DanceSport rivals the ice-skating sports for telegenic appeal. In addition, it has the powerful advantage that it is one of the few sports that has 100% gender parity and offers women exactly the same sport opportunities as men, right down to competing with men in the same events and on the same playing surface.

About CADA

Placez votre préférence de langue:

Français
Anglais

 

Search this Site


 

Regional Associations

Visit the websites of CADA's Regional Associations:

International DanceSport Federation

The Canadian Amateur DanceSport Association is the recognized Canadian Member of the IDSF. Visit the IDSF web site at http://www.idsf.net

IDSF - International DanceSport Federation

CASN|RSAC